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Posted by / 28-Jun-2017 14:18

All these are all studio recordings, all originally published on Telefunken 78 rpms.

Dating found on CDs or online is sometimes contradictory, but the best source I’ve found for elucidating these matters is a great online Mengelberg discography fond on three dabya willemmengelberg dot nl.

Mengelberg performed a lot of Diepenbrock in concert.

But Cornelis Dopper (1870-1939) and Rudolf Mengelberg (1892-1959) are now all but forgotten, even in their own country (even though Chandos published two CDs of symphonies of Dopper in the early 2000s, Cornelis Dopper: Second Symphony - Paan 1 & 2 and Symphony 3 & 6), and it is even the case with Hendrik Andriessen (1892-1981), very popular with the Concertgebouw Orchestra from 1933 to 1980, but who now seems to have been completely overshadowed by his son Louis.

The piece was apparently dropped from the orchestra’s concert repertoire after 1934, and the last time it was performed was on 10 December 1949, and it was Eduard van Beinum conducting then. Mengelberg” for the arrangement and many online sources have reproduced that info, but I don’t think this is true: the label of the original 78s on Telefunken NK 1965 clearly indicates: “bewerking: Prof. Incidentally, on the 78s label, Valerius is also credited as the original composer, and indeed he transcribed the song in his “Nederlandtsche gedenck-clanck” and also made a choral arrangement in his collection of Church Canticles and Hymns (Liedboek voor de Kerken), but the melody was not his own invention.

In the Concertgebouw’s archive the piece listed as “Wilhelmus” is always attributed to composer “none”, e.g. Certainly: also known as “Wilhelmus van Nassouwe” or “Het Wilhelmus”, it is the Netherlands’ national anthem, and “Marnix von St. A lot of fact-checking for little substance: the anthem is a patriotic-bombastic parade and the Thanksgiving hymn sounds inconspicuous like a harmonized hymn.

Wikipedia adds that “the German translation of his most familiar song ), became a potent symbol of the “Throne and Altar” alliance of German civil religion until 1918.

The Concertgebouw archive shows that the piece had been performed a number of times by the orchestra under various conductors since 1898 (already Mengelberg then), but it must not have been in Wagenaar’s arrangement, since records show a Waagenar arrangement for small orchestra dating from November 1938, see this document, p. Which seems to imply that he made it specifically for the recording, which took place the month after. And, other than in reference to this recording, I’ve found no trace online that Rudolf had ever written an arrangement of Incidentally, on the 78s label, Valerius is also credited as the original composer, and indeed he transcribed the song in his “Nederlandtsche gedenck-clanck” and also made a choral arrangement in his collection of Church Canticles and Hymns (), but the melody was not his own invention.

Hendrik Andriessen’s Magna Res est amor is “interesting” only for sounding like a Verdi aria.

But Cornelis Dopper (1870-1939) and Rudolf Mengelberg (1892-1959) are now all but forgotten, even in their own country (even though Chandos published two CDs of symphonies of Dopper in the early 2000s, Chandos 9894 barcode 0951159884 barcode 095115992326), and it is even the case with Hendrik Andriessen (1892-1981), very popular with the Concertgebouw Orchestra from 1933 to 1980, but who now seems to have been completely overshadowed by his son Louis.

Teldec could have been more helpful by providing the exact sources of these recordings – King Record does, although, in truth, I hadn’t noticed the fine print at the bottom of their back cover until after I had done my own detective work.

Wikipedia adds that “the German translation of his most familiar song Wilt Heden Nu Treden (known in English as We Gather Together): Wir treten zum Beten or Altniederländisches Dankgebet (Old Dutch Thanksgiving Prayer), became a potent symbol of the “Throne and Altar” alliance of German civil religion until 1918.

In the United States, it is popularly associated with Thanksgiving Day and is often sung at family meals and at religious services on that day, having been brought to America by Dutch settlers in New Amsterdam, now New York City”.

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So, in chronological order, we get this: Valerius/Wagenaar “Niederlängisches Dankgebet” (track 1) and what is credited (but about this see further) as Marnix von St.

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